What I’m looking at on the internet

Facebook is now offering anti-virus software from McAfee, Norton and Microsoft to its users via the Facebook AV Marketplace. Photo credit: PC Mag

My how time flys by! It’s hard to believe that I’ve been blogging for an entire semester now.

Seeing how this will be my last ‘official’ blog, I thought it would be fun to share some interesting things I’ve found on the web the past few days to give you an idea of what my browsing habits are like.

Here we go!

This really awesome concept video from 1994 shows a tablet computer that can read newspapers just like an iPad, but no one had any idea what an iPad was back then.

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Preview: Upcoming tech events summer 2012

VidCon, a huge annual video conference featuring YouTube stars like Phillip DeFranco, will take place in Anaheim, CA from June 28-30. Photo credit: VidCon

As the semester wraps up here at Purdue, it’s a good time to preview all of the awesome tech events that will be taking place over the summer.

There are likely to be more events added to the summer schedule at Purdue, so be sure to check the Purdue Newsroom for updates.

A great site to check for events on the national/international level is tech enthusiast site CNET.

Here are some of the events that are happening around the Purdue/Lafayette area:

  • April 28: 3rd Annual Purdue electronic vehicle Grand Prix takes place at 1 p.m. at the Purdue Grand Prix track (Free and open to the public)
  • May 12: 2nd Purdue Collegiate evGrandPrix at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway

If you’re not around the Lafayette area, here are some of the large-scale events to look out for this summer:

  • April 26 – 27: TheNextWeb Conference will be taking place in Amsterdam. Events include a hack battle, speakers from prominent companies like YouTube and Reddit, and info about new tech start-ups.
  • June 28-30: 3rd Annual VidCon 2012 in the Anaheim, Calif. Convention Center. Huge video conference to meet and greet with YouTube stars like LiveLavaLive, MeekaKitty and Nanalew. Full list of guests on VidCon website.

What tech events are you looking forward to the most?

Flash and Java will be opt-in features in future versions of Firefox

Adobe's Flash plug-in is one of the biggest reasons that your web browser may crash or your computer may get infected with malware. Photo credit: Eandroid

Mozilla announced last week that it will be adding an opt-in feature to future versions of its Firefox browser that allows users to add only the plug-ins they want to use.

It’s been widely cited that plug-ins are currently the leading cause of slowdowns and security issues with browsers like Firefox, Internet Explorer and Google Chrome.

Adobe’s Flash, Microsoft Silverlight and Sun’s Java are the biggest culprits that can cause your browser to go haywire or get infected with malware.

Firefox’s opt-in feature essentially works just like the popular Flashblock add-on. It leaves blank spots on the web pages you’re viewing, and only displays the content when you click to allow it.

I think it’s great that Mozilla is finally adding this feature. They should have done it a long time ago, since competitors like Google Chrome have had the feature for over a year now.

What are your thoughts about this new opt-in feature?

Do you wish that there were more opt-in features like this in your browser of choice?

In case you’re curious, here’s how a YouTube video page looks when Flashblock is enabled – which is similar to how Mozilla’s opt-in feature will look:

Dick Clark, 1929-2012: 8 Memorable On-Air Moments

Sad day for broadcasting. Rest in peace Dick Clark. You will be missed.

NewsFeed

Dick Clark, often called “the world’s oldest teenager,” passed away Wednesday at the age of 82. NewsFeed takes a look back at the on-air charm that made him a household name and beloved figure on America’s televisions.

Watch Clark introduce himself on a 1966 episode of American Bandstand. He began his hosting run on the show in 1957 and continued until 1989.

Clark was the subject of a 1959 episode of This Is Your Life. Guests included his parents, his friends and former employers.

(PHOTOS:Remembering Dick Clark)

He was known for keeping cool on air, but still had his bloopers. Check out this crackup on The $25,000 Pyramid.

1973 marked Clark’s first New Year’s Eve broadcast. There wasn’t a countdown; instead, Clark called out, “it is 1973 as of…now!”

In 1982, Clark hosted a special remembering 30 years of Bandstand, reflecting his sense of…

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Microsoft Executive sings her resignation on YouTube

Former Microsoft executive Karen Cheng decided to leave the company in style by singing her resignation in a video that was posted to her YouTube channel.

A project manager from tech giant Microsoft decided to go out in style by singing her resignation in a video that was posted to YouTube.

Executive Karen X. Cheng, posted the video to her YouTube account on April 16.

Cheng is moving to another company called Exec, which is a new company that was started by the creator of the popular broadcasting site, Justin.tvaccording to TechCrunch.

The video is very creative but I had mixed feelings as I was watching her sing about all of the things that she worked on while she worked at Microsoft.

There is an element of sadness because it can be sad to leave your job, but I was also laughing a little as I was watching, because the lyrics are quite clever, and she smiled a lot as she was singing.

For your viewing pleasure, here is the video:

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Watch out for this: New bill called CISPA, just like SOPA and PIPA, but worse

A new bill called 'CISPA' is the next version of SOPA/PIPA. It's got much more power behind it though - Internet companies like Facebook, Verizon and Microsoft support it. Photo credit: Digital Trends

A new U.S. centered bill has been proposed that would give law enforcement officials the power to push aside the legal barriers that prevent internet companies from handing your information over to the government.

Sound familiar?

Remember SOPA and PIPA, those failed bills that wanted to give the government the power to police the internet for pirated content?

While they may have failed, another new bill has been proposed that has been flying under the radar in comparison to SOPA and PIPA.

The bill is called CISPA, which stands for the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) which is also known as H.R. 3523.

But this bill is worse than SOPA and PIPA because it has the approval of 28 companies like Facebook, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Verizon, Oracle and Symantec.

Yikes!

So what differentiates CISPA from SOPA and PIPA?

Not much.

The only major difference is that CISPA is about cyber security and SOPA/PIPA were about intellectual property.

But the authors of CISPA, Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI), and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), want you to think that CISPA is “nothing like SOPA.”

Don’t believe it!

It’s still an overreach of governmental power just like with SOPA. But since the outcry over SOPA and PIPA has died down, the Congressmen think that people have put their guard down.

CNET does a good job explaining what CISPA is all about in this quote:

CISPA is primarily a surveillance bill. With CISPA, a company like Google, Facebook, Twitter, or AT&T could intercept your e-mails and text messages, send copies to one another and to the government, and keep it from being sent if it fits into a plan to stop “cybersecurity” threats.

There has also been a revision to CISPA, but they didn’t change much and it’s still a scary piece of legislation.

What are your thoughts about bills like CISPA, SOPA and PIPA?

Is it an overreach of government power?

If you’re not sure what to think, the video below from RT America helps to explain in more detail what CISPA is all about.

Careerbuilder study shows how employers are looking at your Facebook

A survey conducted by Careerbuilder in 2009 looked at how employers are using social media sites to screen job candidates. This infographic shows which sites were the most popular for employers to check out. Photo credit: Huffingtonpost

In 2009, a survey done by CareerBuilder looked at how employers are using social media to look for information about job candidates.

Overall, 45% of the employers admitted that they screen social media for information about job candidates.

What else did they find?

Facebook, rather than LinkedIn, is the most popular website that employers use to look up information about job candidates.

29% of employers admitted that they use Facebook to screen job candidates.

Here are some other fun facts about the way that employers look at your social media profiles:

  • 18% of employers found information that influenced them to hire a candidate
  • 50% got a good feel for the candidate’s personality from social media sites
  • 35% found information that caused them to NOT hire someone
  • 53% found provocative/inappropriate photographs or other information

So what can we make of all this information? Well, here are five things to avoid doing on social media sites, according to the survey:

  1. Avoid leaving around “digital dirt”: those questionable photos about last night’s party, for example.
  2. Terrible troll:  don’t leave huge amounts of pointless, stupid comments with excessive amounts of swear words.
  3. Don’t have a big mouth about your employer: this should go without saying, but don’t rant about your employer on social media sites. It looks REALLY BAD to other employers.
  4. Huge amounts of contacts and comments: don’t add sketchy people as friends because they may leave comments on your profile that look bad on you.
  5. Don’t be negative: keep a positive attitude on social media sites – if everything you say is a rant or a complaint, it looks like you’re a consistently negative person.

Do you try to keep your social media profiles family friendly and clear of these things?

If there are any other pieces of advice you can think of, I’d love to hear them in the comments!