Microsoft Executive sings her resignation on YouTube

Former Microsoft executive Karen Cheng decided to leave the company in style by singing her resignation in a video that was posted to her YouTube channel.

A project manager from tech giant Microsoft decided to go out in style by singing her resignation in a video that was posted to YouTube.

Executive Karen X. Cheng, posted the video to her YouTube account on April 16.

Cheng is moving to another company called Exec, which is a new company that was started by the creator of the popular broadcasting site, Justin.tvaccording to TechCrunch.

The video is very creative but I had mixed feelings as I was watching her sing about all of the things that she worked on while she worked at Microsoft.

There is an element of sadness because it can be sad to leave your job, but I was also laughing a little as I was watching, because the lyrics are quite clever, and she smiled a lot as she was singing.

For your viewing pleasure, here is the video:

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SourceFed: the awesome new YouTube channel

SourcedFed is a YouTube channel created under YouTube's $100 million dollar investment to create original content for the site. Photo credit: Tumblr

If you’re not up to speed on YouTube news, they recently decided to pump $100 million dollars into creating  new channels of original content for the website.

One of my new favorite channels from that multimillion dollar investment is called SourceFed.

SourceFed is essentially a video series on YouTube that delivers short video clips about newsy-type topics ranging from politicians to dinosaurs.

It’s sort of like a short version of The Colbert Report for YouTube.

Or as SourceFed describes their channel:

“everything that should and shouldn’t matter to you explained and broken apart by people who vomit words.”

Their flagship show is called 20 Minutes or Less, and it’s all kinds of awesome.

Why?

SourceFed is based on a blog of the same name by Phillip DeFranco, who is one of the biggest celebrities on YouTube. His show, The Phillip Defranco Show, is equally hilarious as well. I watch his show on a daily basis. [Edit: I should note that Philly D’s show is not family friendly (it contains explicit language), but SourceFed keeps it clean – for the most part.]

The writing for 20 Minutes or Less is really great.

The editing is fast paced, the hosts for SourceFed, which include Phillip DeFrancoJoe Beretta, Lee NewtonElliot Morgan, and Kevin Brueck do a really good job keeping the topics interesting with snarky commentary and using a lot of humor throughout the show.

What do you think about YouTube’s investment in original content? Do you watch any YouTube shows on a regular basis?

Here’s an episode of 20 Minutes or Less from last week where the hosts learn that a new species of dinosaur was discovered.

KONY 2012 is the most viral video ever

KONY 2012 is the most viral video ever, getting 100 million views in six days, according to research by Visible Measures. Photo credit: The Washington Times

The controversial video KONY 2012, which is a 30 minute documentary which seeks the arrest of the Lord’s Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony, has become the most viral video of all time.

The video was viewed over 100 million times in just six days between both YouTube and Vimeo, and it has only been online for about a month.

The video ran rampant through Facebook and Twitter last week because of people in the 18 to 29 year-old demographic, according to research by the Pew Internet and American Life Project.

I have not watched the whole documentary yet, but I remember going to class last week and it seemed like everyone was either talking about KONY 2012 or watching it on their computers, tablets or phones everywhere I went.

The sudden spotlight on the director of the film, Jason Russell, caused him to have a bit of a mental breakdown last week. There has also been a lot of criticism of the group behind the film, Invisible Children.

It seems like all of the news that came out of the film’s release is a reminder of the power of the internet and social media.

Here’s a video from Mashable that explains more about the social media phenomena that lead to KONY 2012 going viral:

Indiana group HipHop4theCity creates video to promote talent in Fort Wayne, Ind.

A group of local artists from Fort Wayne, Ind., collaborated to showcase hip-hop talent in the Midwest. Their video "My City" has become a hit at Fort Wayne radio stations, and on YouTube. Photo credit: HipHop4theCity website

A group of young hip-hop artists from my hometown, Fort Wayne, Ind., recently collaborated to prove that there’s more than just corn in Indiana.

The local artists joined together with the help of non-profit A Better Fort, to create a group called HipHop4theCity, which showcases the talent of young hip-hop artists from the Midwest.

The song they created is called “My City”, and it has become a hit on YouTube, getting almost 70,000 views since its release on Feb. 25.

A biography about the group, and more about the making of the video can be found in this PDF press release from HipHop4theCity’s website.

Here is the video:

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